Anarsist

This idea of conservative anarchism sums up a lot of the Western political tradition, in which the whole idea of government both is justified by and meant to counteract the wildness of the human mind.

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Conservative Anarchism – Threats to Living a Creative Life

D.H. Lawrence uses the term “conservative anarchist” in one of his novels to describe an old clergyman who is tortured by his daughter’s free-spirited nature. The old man is an “anarchist” in that, everywhere he looks, he sees only the uncontrollable nature of the human mind, filled with intense joys and hatreds that refuse to be subdued or exterminated. Yet he is also “conservative” because he refuses to accept this chaos. As a result, he leads an angry, divided existence, in which he both identifies with his daughter’s passionate nature and hates her for it. “His thoughts, secretly, were something to be scared of,” Lawrence writes. “Therefore, in his life, he was fanatically afraid of the unconventional.”

This idea of conservative anarchism sums up a lot of the Western political tradition, in which the whole idea of government both is justified by and meant to counteract the wildness of the human mind. As the philosopher Thomas Hobbes said, in a world without government, life is “nasty, brutish, and short.”

But as many people have noticed through the years, this way of looking at the world creates something of a chicken-and-egg problem: is it that we need authorities to protect us from our own wildness, or is it more the case that authorities invent this idea of wildness in order to justify their own rule? As paradoxical as the terms “conservative” and “anarchist” sound, there is a way in which they reinforce and support each other. Conservatives need anarchists to justify their faith in rules, and anarchists need conservatives to give their rebellion meaning. And politics, more often than not, is a sad dance between these two mismatched partners.

Homer’s Odyssey Examined Through Neologisms

Homer’s classic Epic-Odyssey belongs to the cannons of Greek Literature. Odyssey is a description of the return voyage of the epic hero Ulysses after the Trojan War. He is faced with insurmountable problems with the sea God Poseidon being against him. At home in Ithaca there are various suitors who are greedy for his Penelope. He is successfully able to overcome all the problems and slay the suitors competing for his wife. Here I would like to analyze the Odyssey using newly coined neologisms.

Meta-Psychosis

Meta-Psychosis is a condition where Gods and Goddesses intervene in the fate of man. In the book we counter various aspects of meta-psychosis. Let’s look at the anger of Poseidon on Ulysses causing him to be ship-wrecked. Then there is Goddess Athena who pleas to Zeus so that he might be rescued. We encounter the hero being caught by the wiles of the nymph Calypso and Circe. Meta-psychosis in a modern context applies to humans who are subject to the fate of their destiny.

Demo-anarchism

Demo-anarchism is coined from democracy and anarchism. In the state of Ithaca presuming the death of the protagonist there are a number of suitors competing to gain their hand in marriage of Penelope. This can be classified as the existence of demo-anarchism. Penelope takes a bold stance and evades the wishes of the suitors. The Trojan War was a war fought on democratic grounds and it can be compared to the Gulf War where America freed Kuwait from the hands of Saddam Hussein. The decision made by the God Poseidon not to favor the journey of Ulysses is also a state of demo-anarchism.